Hiking: Månafossen

When you think about hiking in Stavanger, Preikestolen and Kjeragbolten usually come to mind, at least that was the case for me. Remember when TLC told us don’t go chasing waterfalls? 

Well, I didn’t listen and last December I found out about Månafossen. It is the highest waterfall in Rogaland, standing at 92 meters and it is a spectacular sight. It is situated about an hours drive from Stavanger in the Gjesdal Kommune and while I’ve seen buses drive around this area, I’ve only driven there.

Difficulty: 1 star
Season: All year round
Area: Rogaland, West Norway

While this hike isn’t hard, what usually gets to me is the steep incline (looks like I haven’t been doing enough mountain climbers at the gym). To get to the viewpoint of the waterfall, it’ll take anywhere between 15 to 30 minutes, depending on your fitness level and the trail conditions. Typical to Norwegian hikes, the trails are clearly marked out and there are chains to grab along the steeper and riskier sections. There are even staircases at some parts!

I’ve done this hike in multiple conditions; in Winter when it’s covered in snow and/or ice and in Spring when it’s warm and sunny. I personally think this is doable all year around, although you’ll have to be extremely careful of the ice-covered trails in winter. You’ll probably want to use a pair of crampons because it is extremely slippery and dangerous. Despite all the danger, you’ll be treated to what looks like a scene out of Frozen, with of course, a frozen waterfall, snow, ice and a very white scenery.

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In summer, you’re welcomed to lush forest greenery and a vigorously flowing waterfall. With all the snow melted, it becomes significantly easier to continue your hike onward towards the Mån farm. While I have not hiked all the way to the farm, I’ve ventured towards the top of the waterfall. It looks like you can get to the other side of the falls over a bridge but there’s a locked gate preventing you from going across during certain times of the year. Hopefully, when I do a couple of hikes over the summer, it’ll be open and I will update this post!

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On the drive there, you can take a detour and visit Frafjord (about 6km from the falls) – a really peaceful fjord and a nice pit stop to stretch your legs. As the waterfall is in an isolated area, there are no automated parking barriers. As a result, the parking fee operates under a trust system. There is an envelope to put the parking fee of 20NOK and slip it into a metallic box at the foot of the hike. At the car park, you will also find a toilet block and picnic tables to enjoy the surrounding mountainous views and probably have a peak of the waterfall from the bottom.

Well there you have it! This hidden gem tucked a stone’s throw away from the city is worth making a trip to especially if you fancy seeing the highest waterfall in the county. Really simple to get to and a relatively easy hike to do, I reckon it’ll take your breath away. Enjoy the Norwegian outdoors, you’re truly spoilt when it comes to nature here!

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Peace, love and good vibes.

3 Comment

  1. Good post, well written. Thanks. I will be back soon to check out for updates.
    Cheers.

  2. I should admit that your post is really interesting.
    I have spent lots of my free time reading your posts. Many thanks for sharing!

  3. […] usually spoilt for choices when it comes to hiking in Norway; there’s Preikestolen, Kjerag, Månafossen and Galdhøppigen, just to name a few however Trolltunga is the cream of the crop. A challenging […]

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